The truth is, there are options for those athletes

Some view NCAA rule change as step in right direction

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. The NCAA opened the door for college athletes to get paid from use of their name, image and likeness in a major shift in the rules governing collegiate sports.

While some view this as a step in the right direction, others think this could lead to more problems.

“As a national governing body, the NCAA is uniquely positioned to modify its rules to ensure fairness and a level playing field for student athletes,” the association president Mark Emmert said in a statement. “The board’s action creates a path to enhance opportunities for student athletes while ensuring they compete against students and not professionals.”

This decision is currently being debated whether it’s a step in the right direction.

Brian Gearity, a professor of sports coaching at the University of Denver, is an advocate for college athletes getting paid.

“The idea that now we’re able to let athletes be compensated for their own images like we would anyone else is a good thing,” Gearity said. “Is it opening the floodgates to something else or power shifting absolutely.”

Before this new ruling, athletes did not see any profit for any type of memorabilia sold with their names on it.

New York has a similar bill to California; however, it is proposing athletes could see 15 percent of the profits.

“There’s going to be bumps in the road and there’s fear and anxiety and still people holding onto their power,” Gearity said. “But the point is to not get distracted. The ultimate goals are this is going to be a fairer and more equitable thing.”

Cody McDavis, a former Division I basketball player for the University of Northern Colorado disagrees.

McDavis said that he believes the NCAA did the right thing by making this a national ruling after California passed its law.

“What you have if only one state has this is a huge recruiting advantage,” McDavis said. “But I still don’t think this is a fair and equitable ruling. What happens when we have student athletes receiving more than their teammates for the same amount of work on the team? What happens when we have women that are not being paid at all but are as equally deserving as their men counterparts?”

McDavis said other sports like swimming, soccer and track could be left behind in the profits.

“We’re talking about men’s basketball and football here,” McDavis said. “We’re talking about the best athletes in those sports ## ## . The truth is, there are options for those athletes. And it’s called the NFL or the NBA.”

Joe Goldhammer, a professor of sports law and labor law, said this isn’t the final solution.

He believes this could push athletes to a similar direction that was shot down at Northwestern University which is to create a union.

“The Devil is in the details,” Goldhammer said. “The specifics of that are going to be very hard to work out and very complicated. The problem with this whole system is that it lacks equality and lacks fairness for the players. And you’re going to create another level of unfairness if we’re not careful. College athletes have been exploited over the years. The best thing for them is to stand up for themselves sand say what’s best for them and form a labor union.”

The running joke that the Curly W primary logo looks

uniforms for 2020 season

Is it creativity? Tradition? Design? Colors?

That’s why ranking uniforms is so tough: There are so many factors that go into ranking a uniform, with the chief one being subjectivity. What looks nice to you might not look so great to someone else.

But it’s a bit easier in baseball considering there are no out and out bad uniforms in the league in 2020. There are no Buccaneers creamsicle jerseys here. And, given that so many franchises are so rooted in tradition and familiarity, there’s not much wiggle room for total look overhauls. So many teams rely on blue and red. So many rely on script lettering.

There’s an odd dichotomy in baseball, where tradition reigns supreme and fans are generally OK with things staying the same. In some cases, franchises’ fashion forward decisions have met with disastrous backlash (we’re looking at you, Arizona).

But that doesn’t mean there’s no room for creativity in uniforms. We’ve seen teams such as the Padres and Brewers take steps forward with their kits for 2020, reigniting tradition while looking forward to the future.

So, whenever we do get to see these uniforms on the field, they’ll be a sight for sore eyes. Taking colors, logos, alternates and design into account, here’s how they rank:

The “C” logo (if we can call it that) that’s used on the Indians’ hats is pretty bland and generic, and arguably no team utilizes its color scheme worse. And there are lots of teams that rely on the red, white and blue as their primary colors.

With Chief Wahoo (thankfully) phased out of rotation, perhaps the Indians would be in for a total reboot of their franchise? Maybe a return of the Cleveland Spiders? The Cleveland Bluebirds? Whatever the case may be, the generic look of the Tribe is in need of an update. “Major League” be damned. Joe Rivera

While the Phillies’ alternate uniforms are nice cream uniforms in general are pretty and underutilized as alternates, while powder blue is en vogue again the whole package is kind of eh.

Philadelphia benefits from recognizable script across the chest, but there’s also something about the red pinstripes that’s tough on the eyes. Given their locale, Philadelphia would probably also use a helping of a bit more of Americana in their uniforms utilizing their Liberty Bell logo a bit more over their current “P” logo would be a welcome sight. Joe Rivera

When the Diamondbacks went all in on their uniform redesign in the mid 2010s, there was a fair amount of ridicule thrown their way. Some of it was warranted the pants with the snake skin designs at the shoulders and ankles looked weird but they deserve some credit for having an identity and owning it.

Here’s where Arizona is snakebitten: While some teams have three primary colors, the D backs have five, just a few short of a rainbow ## ## . (“Rainbow Snakes” is a much cooler name than Diamondbacks, for what it’s worth). Also, the “D BACKS” across the chest seems a bit amateurish.

Arizona deserves lots of credit for trying, but a simpler, sleeker more streamlined look would probably work better for them. The running joke that the Curly W primary logo looks like a Walgreen’s logo isn’t so much humor as it is a statement of fact, and their script unis are pretty bland altogether.

Like the Phillies, a team that’s based in the Nation’s Capital could use a bit more taste of ‘Murrica. There’s no Eagle, and the stars and stripes are present in one of their alternate uniforms. Joe Rivera

The Orioles are one of three teams in MLB that use black and orange as two of their primary colors, which don’t particularly inspire excitement and joy. More like gloom.

That said, the Orioles uniforms are pretty simple: script lettering across the front and devoid of stripes, piping or otherwise on the tops. A single leg stripe on the pants serves as the only bit of decoration.

Really not much going on here, but they get points for utilizing the cartoon bird over the realistic one from a few years back. Joe Rivera

The Rox boast one of the best color schemes in the league, but there’s just something off about their uniforms. Could just be a dose of generic ness: The pinstripes feel like they don’t fit, while the away grays are essentially just cut and paste clipart.

The primary “CR” cap logo doesn’t really give the Rockies much of an identity. The purple alternates they have are nice, too. But the whole set needs more. Joe Rivera

The Cardinals are about as traditionalist as it gets when it comes to their uniforms, and that’s what helps them out a bit here.

The current birds on bat logo across the chest has been used since 1998, but it just feels like it’s time for an update. Even more so when you consider the logo is used across all iterations of their uniform home, away and alternates.

The “StL” cap logo is getting a small rework for 2020 with the outlining of the letters not as thick so it looks a little less blurred on the cap. It’s a small but welcome change to make it look a little crisper. Joe Rivera

The Rangers are . doing a lot this year. With the addition of the new ballpark, they’ve also rolled out a brand new closet. Several of these uniforms are good, like the powder blue and the new Rangers script. Other elements, like new belts, caps, logos, and mismatched drop shadows are just confusing.

The Rangers are becoming the new Diamondbacks with their six (six!!! Who needs six!!!) uniforms and needlessly complicated rebranding. This uniform redesign had the chance to be good, but all we really needed from the Rangers was them to pick a dang primary color. Red or blue, guys? That’s all we want to know. Emily Carson

The orange teams did not fare well in this ranking. You can blame personal biases or whatever but really, who likes orange that much?

The Giants are probably one of the more iconic orange franchises (not that there are many orange or iconic franchises to compete with). The home cream jerseys aren’t bad. They keep the orange to a minimum, except on the alternates, which is the right choice. Some advice? Wear the black jerseys more, the color will keep you guys warmer when you’re in the bay. Emily Carson

Maybe the Angels should be higher on this list. After all, they definitely aren’t the worst uniforms on here. They’re pleasing to the eye, the design works with the logo and they look sharp on the field.

However, just like their perennial superstar Mike Trout, all that still isn’t going to get them a trophy. The uniforms, while better than some, are just not winner material.

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